Boisset Bourgogne Chardonnay 2014

IN: TRAVELSWINE OF THE WEEK COLUMN

This week I’ve decided to pick my ultimate Christmas white wine. I’m a boring old traditionalist so it’ll be a turkey on our table on Christmas day and I’m assuming that most people out there will be doing the same, so if you’re still figuring things out for the big day then let me see if I can help you out. For me has simply has to be Chardonnay and more specifically, Burgundy. Boisset Wines have been amongst our favourites ever since head winemaker and legendary Burgundian dude, Gregory Patriat cruised in to the shop back in 2004 and wowed us with his exceptional silver hair (seriously, Google him) and brilliant range of wines. His speciality is making wines from tiny plots of vines, something which accounts for the limited production of most of his wines. Boisset Bourgogne Blanc 2014 (£16) is my ultimate Christmas white wine is made using fruit mainly from selected parcels from the Cote de Beaune....
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The Liberator ‘Francophile’ Syrah

IN: TRAVELSWINEWINE OF THE WEEK COLUMN

It’s lovely that regulars to the shop are beginning to recognise and appreciate the series of Liberator Wines within our South Africa section. No one in the world knows more about the South African wine scene than our friend Rick Kelly, aka ‘The Liberator’. It is the belief of Rick that beyond the periphery of South Africa’s conventional vineyard regions lie great vinous treasures, resigned to anonymity ; forgotten, abandoned or simply undiscovered. So it’s therefore up to our intrepid Cape Crusader to seek them out and ‘Liberate’ these precious parcels. Mainly released as small batch limited bottlings or ‘Episodes’ with some as small as a single barrel (such as recent release Episode 14 ‘The Wendy House’ Chenin Blanc). Episode 7 ‘Swartland Revolution’ has been incredibly popular and there’s still some left of this brilliant Cinsault Cabernet blend but my current Wine of the Week is a Liberator that’s neither an Episode or a Special Release but one that is...
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Kilchoman Sanaig

IN: CYCLINGMALT OF THE MONTH COLUMNTRAVELSWHISKY

Perfect time for a Malt of the Month column having just returned from a three day cycle adventure around Kintyre, Islay and Arran visiting many of the great distilleries. Having visited ten distilleries and tasting around forty whiskies the tricky thing now is to pick my number one from the trip. A Bowmore 18yo Single Sherry Cask was pretty special, as was the Cask Strength Lagavulin 12yo but it was from the tiny family owned farm distillery at Kilchoman that had the resounding winner. After visiting six distilleries on day 1 and plenty more drams in the Port Charlotte hotel that evening the next morning involved a gentle peddle over the hill from Bruichladdich to Kilchoman where we were greeted with the greatest bacon roll I’ve ever had followed shortly by a sensational tour and a glass of new make spirit. Everything about this place makes me smile and it wasn’t the whisky that left me with a warm fuzzy...
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Kwaremont Beer

IN: CYCLINGNEWSTRAVELS

This is the first occasion that I’ve done a piece on a beer, strange seeing as we’re as enthusiastic about them as we are wine and whisky. We have an area dedicated craft producers, granted most are Scottish, however this piece is being allocated to one from the country whose name epitomizes beer production; Belgium. The Kwaremont is famous for being one of the most iconic stretches of road in world cycling. A steep 2.2km section of cobbles that comes towards the end of the 265km race of The Tour of Flanders. Imagine the excitement when I find myself on the Kwaremont for this year’s edition of the Tour of Flanders slurping on none other than Kwaremont beer watching the pros race past. So after weeks of messing around, a shipment of this brilliant Belgian beer has just arrived. Would it taste as good as on that wonderful spring day in the Flemish Ardennes?? OH YES!! It’s been a week and I...
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Five superb New World wines to try in 2016

IN: TRAVELSWINE

A New Year, a fresh start, right? So why not leap into 2016 enjoying the future of wine as we know it. We predict 2016 to be the year of big reds, especially New World offerings. New World wines, for those who may not know, come from countries that were once colonies, such as Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Chile. They tend to have much hotter climates than Old World Wine origins, and this tends to give the produce a much fuller body, creating much bolder fruit flavours. Unlike their Old World counterparts, New World wines have no strict rules or regulations imposed on them. Wine makers are free to experiment in any which way they please, making the wine more varied and exciting! Here are our top 5 New World Wines to look out for in 2016 Snapper Rock Pinot Noir Snapper Rock is a beautiful drink, perfect for any evening. It is a bright garnet colour with...
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Think you know Spanish wine? Think again!

IN: PRODUCERSTRAVELSWINE

There are some people out there who completely ignore Spanish wine and that bothers us at Lockett Bros. Spanish wine is fantastic and if the country’s wine marketers’ current efforts are rewarded, more and more Brits will be drinking it. There’s a big PR push to position Spanish wine as the natural pairing to particular foods. The “Eat Spain Drink Spain” campaign certainly has merit so let’s go on a little Spanish wine adventure. Spanish wine means variety Spain is the third largest wine producer in the world. It has more than 2.9 million acres of vineyards, making it the most widely planted wine-producing nation. There are more than 400 varieties of grape planted in Spain although 80 per cent of the country’s wine production uses just 20 of these. Rioja, Valdepenas and the northwest region of Galicia are the major wine regions in Spain, so if you are thinking of your next holiday’s destination these might be the go-to...
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A peaty problem: Islay peat to run out by 2021?

IN: NEWSPRODUCERSTRAVELSWHISKY

A shocking problem has been revealed in the world of whisky. The beautiful Scottish island of Islay, famous for its whisky distilleries, has been struck unlucky by an accidental discovery, which suggests its peat could run out by 2021. A moment of silence for the terrible news please. This all started with a feasibility study, conducted by a company looking into opening a new distillery on the island. From the study, a significant drop in peat beds was discovered. The last survey was conducted in 1980 but there is a possibility that several mistakes were made as various assumptions were concluded from only a few core samples. This made the recent study even more shocking for many in the industry. Why should Islay whisky lovers be worried? What does peat have to do with whisky in the first place? If you’re not a whisky connoisseur, these are valid questions. Well, peat is influential in the taste of many whiskies. But...
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Focus on Italian wines

IN: PRODUCERSTRAVELSWINE

It’s been said before, but Italians really know how to live and much of that is about good food and good wine. Yes, we can learn a lot from the Italians! Italy is blessed with some of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world and if you’re looking for a wine holiday, you would be hard pushed to find a better destination. That inviting climate, the stunning settings, the people and the wine… oh, the wine! And the food! Can you tell that we love Italy? Italy is still the world’s largest wine producer in terms of volume and, of course, it would be a sweeping generalisation to say it was all great, but trust us when we say that a great proportion of it is spectacular. Italy has 20 defined wine regions and they all offer something slightly different. Variety is the spice of life, according to the Italians and wine lovers could spend a month in the country...
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Why is Sauvignon Blanc so popular?

IN: PRODUCERSTRAVELSWINE

Sauvignon Blanc. It’s the wine people turn to again and again because they enjoy it and it’s a safe bet, but why is it so popular? Go into any wine merchant or supermarket in practically any developed country in the world and you’ll find dozens of Sauvignon Blanc options but it wasn’t always like this. Before the 1980s, Sauvignon Blanc was a variety that featured rarely in the world’s top wines but today it’s a staple. Can you imagine a world without Sauvignon Blanc? So what happened? Well, we have New Zealand to thank for its popularity today. Surprising perhaps that a relatively young wine-producing nation could have almost single-handedly changed our wine tastes, but it’s absolutely true. Pre-1980s, none of the big French wine producers paid any attention to Sauvignon Blanc. They didn’t need to. It was of course a component of white Bordeaux but that was about as far as its use went. Then those crafty Kiwis, without...
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Australian wine: Time to get down with it

IN: PRODUCERSTRAVELSWINE

Apparently, the global perception of Australian wine doesn’t match the high-quality reality, according to Wine Australia. This puzzles us. We’ve long been massive fans of all that the great Land Down Under has to offer and especially its wine so we wrongly assumed the whole world felt the same. But nope. Apparently there are still swathes of people who’d rather stick with the tried and tested favourites than try an Aussie offering. We have to change this! Those who don’t take a gamble (and it’s not even a gamble) with Australian wines are missing out. Australia produces some of the finest wines in the world! Australian wines are some of the most diverse you could ever hope to come across, from its finesse-filled Cabernets to its world-class Chardonnays, Australia really does have something for every wine lover. So, just to be clear, we love Australian wine. You should too. Here’s a little nugget of trivia for you. Despite being a...
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